Michaela Gleave’s Model for the end of the universe series depicts four possible scenarios for the end of everything. Drawing from current scientific hypotheses and presented as ‘scores’ – implying a performance or musical composition – the series brings imagined beauty and humour to understandings of the end of time.

Michaela Gleave is an installation and performance artist whose practice investigates the physicality of perception and interrogates the systems and structures through which we construct our image of reality.

Gleave has participated in residency programs in New York, Tokyo, Berlin, Iceland and regional Australia, including being resident artist with the CSIRO’s Astronomy and Space Science division during 2012-13. Her recent exhibitions include Trace: Performance and its Documents at the Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2014);A Day is Longer than a Year at the Fremantle Arts Centre, Western Australia (2013); Our Frozen Moment at Performance Space, Sydney, 2012; We Are Made of Stardust (solo) as part of Art Futures at the Hong Kong Art Fair, 2012; Octopus 11: The Matter of Air at Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 2011; A Perfect Day to Chase Tornadoes (White) at the Kunstquartier Bethanien, Berlin, 2010; and Primavera 09 at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2009.

MICHAELA GLEAVE

Born 1980, Alice Springs, NT, Australia. Lives and works Sydney, Australia.

Model for the end of the universe 1: circular motion/big crunch 2013
Event-based score: Lambda print on photographic rag paper
29.7 x 42 cm (paper)
Edition 2/4

Model for the end of the universe 2: big freeze/heat death 2013
Event-based score: Lambda print on photographic rag paper
29.7 x 42 cm
Edition 2/4

Model for the end of the universe 3: multiverse/false vacuum 2013
Event-based score: Lambda print on photographic rag paper
29.7 x 42 cm
Edition 2/4

Model for the end of the universe 4: singularity/big rip 2013
Event-based score: Lambda print on photographic rag paper
29.7 x 42 cm
Edition 2/4

All works courtesy the artist and Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne.
Photography: Mark Ashkanasy, Courtesy RMIT Gallery