At Home Activity – A World of Robots — Experimenta

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Development shot of ‘Little Sunfish’ (2019) by Michael Candy. Experimenta Life Forms.

At Home Activity –
A World of Robots

 

Artist Michael Candy shares how a real life robot was the basis for his artwork, ‘Little Sunfish’, and asks us to consider the implications of a future where there is robotic sentience.

Follow the easy step-by-step instructions to write your own story about robots within our lives.

Suitable for young creators (10 years+), the activity takes 1 hour


Remember! You can be as imaginative as you want to be. Maybe you have never met a robot before, so write about what you think your future robot encounter will be like. All robot futures are possible in storytelling.

When the activity is complete, send us your work so we can collect and share the many types of robot encounters.

 

Step 1: Hear from the Artist

 

Step 2: Gather Your Materials

You will need:

  • A pen, grey lead pencil or marker (your choice!)
  • 2 x A4 pieces of paper

 

Step 3: Download this activity PDF sheet

Click here to download. You can print out the activity sheet or just draw it onto your own piece of paper.

Suitable for young creators (10 years+), the activity takes 1 hour and offers a series of writing tasks that asks the author to consider their relationship with robots.

This activity has been developed with Melbourne based centre for young writers, 100 Story Building.

 

 

Submit your stories!

We want to hear from you! Click this button to submit your stories and drawings to Experimenta, so we can discover the many types of robots found across the world.

 

About the Artist


Michael Candy

Michael Candy works with a vocabulary of robotics, hardware hacking, intervention and video. This didactic practice seeks to mediate the liminal realm that technology oppresses on the physical world.

Michael CandyYugambeh Country
Burleigh Heads, QLD, Australia

Michael Candy works with a vocabulary of robotics, hardware hacking, intervention and video. This didactic practice seeks to mediate the liminal realm that technology oppresses on the physical world. His installations and projects often emerge as social experiments or ecological interventions in public space.

Candy has been involved in many international and local projects and exhibitions, notably: Water, (GOMA, Brisbane), Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, (AGSA, Adelaide), Ars Electronica Festival, (Linz, Austria), The Kathmandu Triennale (Kathmandu,Nepal), The Forum of Sensory Motion (Athens, Greece), The Instrument Builders Project + Hackteria Lab (Yogyakarta, Indonesia) and Hawapi (Huepetuhe, Peru).