UTAS Panel: Ways of Knowing — Experimenta

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UTAS Panel:
Ways of Knowing

Friday 13 August 2021
10am- 12pm (AEST)
Cost: Free


First Nation’s epistemologies, ways of knowing and understanding life, through artistic and research practices

Join us for this free online panel discussion with First Nation artists, curators, and writers, Dr Léuli Eshrāghi, Suzanne Kite and Dr Jennifer Evans, who will discuss their artworks and research around First Nation’s epistemologies. This event is hosted by Experimenta and the University of Tasmania. 

How do First Nation’s epistemologies influence ways of thinking and understanding life? In this session we will hear from speakers discussing the approaches they take as artists, curators, artists and researchers towards embedding and unpacking First Nations ways of knowing in their practices and research.

About the Speakers:


Suzanne Kite

Suzanne Kite is a musician and multimedia artist working around the complexities of First Nations identities in the United States. She is a PhD candidate at Concordia University, Research Assistant for the Initiative for Indigenous Futures, and a 2019 Trudeau Scholar.

Suzanne Kite

Suzanne Kite is a musician and multimedia artist working around the complexities of First Nations identities in the United States.

Kite is an Oglala Lakota performance artist, visual artist, and composer with a BFA from CalArts in Music Composition and a MFA from Bard College. She is a PhD candidate at Concordia University, Research Assistant for the Initiative for Indigenous Futures, and a 2019 Trudeau Scholar. Her research is concerned with contemporary Lakota ontologies, which include non-human beings and the development of protocols and relations for stones, metals, and Artificial Intelligence. Recently, Kite has developed Machine Learning body and hair interfaces, carbon fiber sculptures, and immersive installations and participated in the 2019 Toronto Biennial of Art. Kite has also published in journals and magazines, including in The Journal of Design and Science (MIT Press).

Suzanne Kite’s artwork Itówapi Čík’ala (Little Picture) is exhibiting as part of Experimenta Life Forms: International Triennial of Media Art, Experimenta’s 8th touring show that travels nationally until 2023.

Dr Léuli Eshrāghi

Dr Léuli Eshrāghi (Sāmoan, Persian, Cantonese), visual artist, writer, curator and researcher, works between Australia and Canada. Ia intervenes in display territories to centre Indigenous kin constellations, sensual and spoken languages, and ceremonial-political practices.

Dr Léuli Eshrāghi

Dr Léuli Eshrāghi (Sāmoan, Persian, Cantonese), visual artist, writer, curator and researcher, works between Australia and Canada. Ia intervenes in display territories to centre Indigenous kin constellations, sensual and spoken languages, and ceremonial-political practices. Through performance, moving image, writing and installation, ia engages with Indigenous futurities as haunted by ongoing militourist and missionary violences that once erased faʻafafine-faʻatane people from kinship and knowledge structures.

Eshrāghi has curated projects including Sāmoan Hxstories, Screens and Intimacies at A Space Gallery, Toronto, and imagineNATIVE, Écrans autochtones: temporalité et mouvement with Mylène Guay also within imagineNATIVE, ʻO le ūa na fua mai Manuʻa at UNSW Galleries, Sydney, Ua numi le fau at Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, and in a trilogy co-curated with Tarah Hogue, Lana Lopesi, Sarah Biscarra Dilley and Freja Carmichael, Transits and Returns at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Auckland.

Dr Jennifer Evans

Dr Jennifer Evans is a queer dharug woman living on, and with connections to, palawa country, lutruwita (Tasmania), Australia. Jennifer is a social and cultural geographer whose research and advocacy blends technology, country and queerness to create safe spaces for Indigenous methodological research.

Dr Jennifer Evans

Dr Jennifer Evans is a queer dharug woman living on, and with connections to, palawa country, lutruwita (Tasmania), Australia. Jennifer is a social and cultural geographer whose research and advocacy blends technology, country and queerness to create safe spaces for Indigenous methodological research. Dr Evans is passionate about community participation and empowerment in decision-making processes, a resilience borne from a lifetime of lived experiences including being an architect to picking potatoes to survive. She now works as an Indigenous Research Fellow at the Rural Clinical School, University of Tasmania, to support palawa students to reach their goals. She has won multiple community awards for her business and social impact.